March News Briefs

Paradise Valley Area Wolf Found West of Denver
Petraeus Taps Greg Mortensen as Consultant
Legendary Elk Bites the Dust

Paradise Valley Area Wolf Found
West of Denver

As the Russian proverb says, a wolf lives on its feet, and a lone wolf from Paradise Valley is living proof. Traveling 1,000 miles circuitously  to Colorado, an 18-month-old female wolf wearing a GPS collar turned up recently about 120 miles west of Denver, in Eagle County, according to Colorado Wildlife officials.
Formerly with  the Mill Creek Pack north of Yellowstone, the gray wolf made her way from Montana though Wyoming, Idaho, Utah, and then Colorado. 
"Young wolves often cover remarkable distances looking for a mate and a new territory," said Department of Wildlife director Tom Remington. "If this wolf doesn’t find a pack, she’ll likely keep moving. We’ve seen at least one Yellowstone wolf in Colorado before, but we have no reason to believe that wolves have established a pack in the state yet," KMGH TV in Denver reported.
Colorado’s wildlife policy gives wolves free range across the state provided they do not conflict with livestock or humans.
Efforts to reintroduce wolves in the state have failed.
Satellite data shows the wolf traveled south from the Mill Creek area near Paradise Valley into Yellowstone National Park, then to the Bridger-Teton National Forest in Wyoming.
She wandered across southwestern Wyoming, southeast Idaho, and northeastern Utah before making her way into Colorado in February, a round about trip of over 1,000 miles, though only 450 miles from her old stomping grounds in Montana.

 

Petraeus Taps Greg Mortensen as Consultant

U.S. Central Command chief David Petraeus, who earned praise for commanding the troop surge in Iraq, now regarded as a success, has his work cut out for him in Afghanistan and in dealing with interference from across the border in Pakistan. Petraeus has solicited creative strategies for dealing with the problem that include providing more security for local populations, and drawing them away from militants. The overall strategy is still warfare, but Petraeus has also enlisted the likes of Greg Mortensen as a consultant. Mortensen is the founder of the Bozeman-based Central Asia Institute, author of the best-seller Three Cups of Tea, and a man intimately familiar with the dangerous area of Northwest Pakistan. Mortensen was also recently nominate for a Nobel Prize for his work in Pakistan and, most notably, establishing 78 schools for girls in the area, some of which the Taliban have destroyed. 
With a fundamental review of our stance in Afghanistan  under way in Washington, and with Petraeus’ strategic and cultural acumen having been demonstrated in Iraq, senior intelligence officials apparently see Mortensen’s successes and experience as valuable in determining the path ahead. The Pentagon, according to Mortensen, has even made Three Cups of Tea required reading for officers training in counter-intelligence, not for the purpose of cultural sensitivity alone, but for the tactical value gained, as in Iraq, through working closely with local groups.
Speaking recently in Bozeman, at the Museum of the Rockies, Mortensen said that President Obama’s sending of additional troops to Afghanistan goes against the desires and interests of the Afghan people. “The Taliban’s greatest fear is not the bullet, but the pen,” Mortensen said, emphasizing building schools and advancing education as the best way to combat extremism.

Legendary Elk Bites the Dust

A large bull elk that made his presence well-known in the Mammoth Hot Springs area of Yellowstone National Park every fall for several years running met his end last month just north of the Park line.
The big bull elk with the bad reputation, known simply as “Number Six” by the Park Service, because of the number on his black and orange ear tag, apparently flipped over on his back between two large rocks while crossing a fence and suffocated to death, according to Park officials. Number Six kept rangers, park visitors, and other elk on their toes every fall during the rut, as he rounded up his harem of  about 100 cow elk in the Mammoth area. He would charge tourists or vehicles as quickly as he would challenge other bulls, and rangers developed a method of  maneuvering a vehicle in front of Number Six that allowed the elk to see his reflection on the Park vehicle's hood. Rangers claimed this method worked wonders in distracting the Paradise Valley Area Wolf Found West of Denver

As the Russian proverb says, a wolf lives on its feet, and a lone wolf from Paradise Valley is living proof. Traveling 1,000 miles circuitously  to Colorado, an 18-month-old female wolf wearing a GPS collar turned up recently about 120 miles west of Denver, in Eagle County, according to Colorado Wildlife officials.
Formerly with  the Mill Creek Pack north of Yellowstone, the gray wolf made her way from Montana though Wyoming, Idaho, Utah, and then Colorado. 
"Young wolves often cover remarkable distances looking for a mate and a new territory," said Department of Wildlife director Tom Remington. "If this wolf doesn’t find a pack, she’ll likely keep moving. We’ve seen at least one Yellowstone wolf in Colorado before, but we have no reason to believe that wolves have established a pack in the state yet," KMGH TV in Denver reported.
Colorado’s wildlife policy gives wolves free range across the state provided they do not conflict with livestock or humans.
Efforts to reintroduce wolves in the state have failed.
Satellite data shows the wolf traveled south from the Mill Creek area near Paradise Valley into Yellowstone National Park, then to the Bridger-Teton National Forest in Wyoming.
She wandered across southwestern Wyoming, southeast Idaho, and northeastern Utah before making her way into Colorado in February, a round about trip of over 1,000 miles, though only 450 miles from her old stomping grounds in Montana.

 




         
   


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